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Product Recalls And Defects In The United States

Sadaka Associates Defective Products 0 Comments

product-recalls

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, 200 to 300 product recalls occur each year. As a result, there are 22,000 deaths and 29 million injuries related to product recalls and defects. When manufacturers or distributors create an unsafe product and fail to warn consumers of the dangerous products, the manufacturer is liable for injury or death. Strict liability holds a manufacturer responsible for defective products that result in injury or death. Design defects occur when the product design is unsafe for the public. Manufacturing defects have a sound product design but methods of making the products are unsafe. Warning defects occur when products are sold for public use without sufficient instructions or warnings stating possible injury if used incorrectly. Each of these three reasons result yearly in product recalls.

Recent product recalls


Baby Rattles

Kids II Oball recalled 680,000 baby rattle toys in the United States and 17,000 in Canada. The spherical baby toy contains a small disc with tiny beads. The small disc at the center can break causing a chocking hazard to children. Two consumers have reported children with beads in their mouths. While three consumers reported children gagging on the beads. The company is urging consumers to take the baby rattle way from children. The defective product has the model number 81031 and affects rattles that are pink, blue, green and orange in color.

SodaStream

SodaStream voluntarily recalled 51,000 bottles in the United States and 7,600 in Canada. The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports that SodaStream’s one-liter, blue-tinted, carbonated bottles can burst under pressure causing injury to users or bystanders. Bursting can occur when a consumer fills the bottles with CO2 or shakes them. Due to manufacturing defect the bottles cannot handle pressure. SodaStream have received no reports of injury. The one-liter bottles have the printed expiration date of 4/2020 sold from February 2016 to January 2017. The recalled SodaStream bottles sold at retailers such as Bed Bath & Beyond, Walmart, Target and more.

Himalayan Rock Salt Lamps

Used for a variety of health claims, Himalayan Rock Salt Lamps are recalled due to the dimmer switch overheating resulting in a fire hazard. Though there are different styles of lamps, the lamps sold under the brand name Lumiere are being recalled. The rock salt lamps recalled are either a basket of small rocks or one large rock on a wooden base. These lamps are primarily sold at Michaels stores nationwide between July and November 2016.

Samsung Washing Machines

Samsung received 733 reports of washing machines excessively vibrating or the top completely detaching from the chassis or base frame resulting in the unit exploding. Nine injuries related to the defect include an injured shoulder, a broken jaw and fall related injuries according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission. This has resulted in Samsung recalling 2.8 million top-loading washing machines.

Samsung Galaxy Note 7

Samsung recalled Galaxy Note 7 smartphones due to a manufacturing defect and design flaw. The design flaw is due to an unusually thin lining between the electrodes of the battery. As a result the batteries overheat posing a fire hazard. 1.9 million smartphones are recalled in the United States. The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports 96 cases of batteries overheating, 13 consumer burn reports and 47 reports of property damage.

Hoverboards

More than 500,000 hoverboards from ten companies are recalled. The self-balancing, battery powered scooters known as hoverboards catch fire due to design defects of the lithium battery packs overheating. 99 incidents of battery fires or explosions are reported. In an investigation by the Consumer Product Safety Commission 60 hoverboard fires happened in 20 states costing over two million in property damage.

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